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Reviews: Ranking Of Best Spider-Man Comics From The Bronze Age

 

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'The Night Gwen Stacy Died.'
‘The Night Gwen Stacy Died.’ Marvel Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

*This ranking uses the CGC count. Click here for more information.

1970s MOST IMPORTANT SPIDER-MAN COMICS

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: THE NIGHT GWEN STACY DIED (1973)

Collects Amazing Spider-Man #121.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Gloriously, The Night Gwen Stacy Died is near the top of Spider-Man‘s most valuable comics. On the Top 200 Most Valuable Comic Books of the Bronze Age (1970-1980), it holds a Record Sale of $8400 and a Minimum Value of $200. And really, we know why. Indeed, it is the story that forever broke both Peter Parker’s and fans’ hearts.

Definitely, comic collectors should rave about this comic since it has aged well. Today, Gwen Stacy has been revived in some alternate form as Spider-Girl in Spider-Verse and remains wildly popular.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Amazing SPIDER-MAN #121 (Euro Variant) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: ’80s HE-MAN AND MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

BEST: THE GOBLIN’S LAST STAND (1973)

Collects Amazing Spider-Man #122.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Gloriously, The Goblin’s Last Stand is collected under Amazing Spider-Man Epic Collection: The Goblin’s Last Stand (Amazing Spider-Man (1963-1998)) on Amazon. On the Top 200 Most Valuable Comic Books of the Bronze Age (1970-1980), it holds a Record Sale of $5760 and a Minimum Value of $90. Furthermore, it ranks 38th on the Top 200 and 8th on the CGC Ranking. And really, we know why. Indeed, it is the story that forever led to a temporary end to one of comicdom’s most intense rivalry.

Definitely, comic collectors should collect this comic. Today, Green Goblin’s popularity has resurfaced thanks to the blockbuster Spider-Man: No Way Home movie.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Amazing Spider-Man Epic Collection: The Goblin’s Last Stand (Amazing Spider-Man (1963-1998)) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: THE PUNISHER STRIKES TWICE (1974)

Collects Amazing Spider-Man #129.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In 1974, the Punisher appeared in Marvel comics for the first time. Really, collectors have raved about the value of this comic which ranks 17th on the Top 200. Indeed, Punisher has created a true cultural movement which has affected law enforcement and even politics. On our GCG Count, the story ranks second. On the Top 200, it holds a Record Sale of $43,200 and a Minimum Value of $670.

Definitely, Punisher has a large following beyond comics and a movie adaptation. In many ways, his value expresses an underground culture that values patriotism, guns and violence. Below, is the first printing of the Marvel Milestone Edition.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Milestone AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #129 (Direct Edition) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

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BEST: Never Let the Black Cat Cross Your PatH! (1979)

Collects Amazing Spider-Man #194

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Finally, rounding our review is Amazing Spider-Man #194 (1974). Really, the thrilling introduction of Black Cat marks a transition to the more dramatic stories of the 1980s at Marvel. In the Top 200, the comic ranks 98th while our CGC Count ranks it as tenth. In terms of value, the Record Sale is $5,200 while the Minimum Value is $30.

Definitely, if you are looking to buy or sell, this comic continues to have good numbers. Generally, the comic is also sold as the German Euro Variant.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Amazing SPIDER-MAN #194 (Euro Variant) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT AMAZING SPIDER-MAN SALES:

Comichron: Amazing Spider-Man Sales Figures.


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Database Comics

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REFERENCES

List Of Important Comics From The 1970s in Rare Comics.
Amazing Spider-Man Vol 1 121 in Marvel Database.
Top 200 Most Valuable Comic Books of the Bronze Age (1970-1980) in Sell My Comic Books.
Amazing Spider-Man Vol 1 122 in Marvel Database.
Amazing Spider-Man Vol 1 194 in Marvel Database.
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Reviews: Essential Silver Surfer Vol. 1

Silver Surfer #1.
 

REVIEWS

Silver Surfer #1.
Silver Surfer #1. Marvel Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

ESSENTIAL SILVER SURFER STORY

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: ESSENTIAL SILVER SURFER VOL. 1 (1968-1970)

Collects Silver Surfer #1-18.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In comicdom, there are few legendary names. In 1968, two of Marvel comics’ biggest names collaborated on a timeless and favorite story: Legendary writer and editor Stan Lee worked with artist John Buscema to bring the classic Silver Surfer series of the period.

As matter of fact, I gave 5.0 out of 5.0 to Essential Silver Surfer, Vol. 1 (Marvel Essentials) for being a dreamy space (or earth-bound) soap opera about a god-like alien estranged among the mere mortals. Really, it does not get better than this Marvel Essential. Indeed, this is the comic genre at its best for all Marvel-ites to enjoy.

To recommend, the trade paperback format offers some of the biggest 528 pages that fans can enjoy. From the beginning, what separates Silver Surfer from other Marvel heroes is that he has no flaws, except that of human misunderstanding. Indeed, witness Surfer’s titanic battles against the Overlord, the Stranger, Loki, Spider-Man. And yes… the dreamy cover and the dramatic start of the Silver Surfer vs Thor rivalry..

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INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Essential Silver Surfer, Vol. 1 (Marvel Essentials) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

DIALOGUE

In many respects, Silver Surfer’s first classic story is Shakespearean melo-drama. First, our protagonist is a melancholic character who is comfortable with monologues and long speeches. At the same time, he has the flair for the dramatic and seems to experience events in a passionate way. Indeed, witness Surfer saving a young Latino woman from war only to be rewarded with a kiss. But, lo and behold, his forsaken lover Shalla-Bal witnesses the scene from a flying spacecraft.

PLOT

Volume 1 focuses on Silver Surfer after the events of the Galactus trilogy and Fantastic Four #55-60. In fact, Silver Surfer rebelled against Galactus his master in order to save the Earth from destruction. After, Galactus punished the Sentinel by removing his space-born powers. Now, the Silver Surfer is stranded on Earth which he cannot leave due to a space barrier placed by the Devourer of Worlds. During his time on Earth, the tragic hero attempts to gain humanity’s trust and understanding but with continued failures. The plot progresses quickly and takes him to Asgard, the Netherworld and into space. Really, it does not get better than a space-faring soap opera!

CHARACTERIZATION

Where Stan Lee and John Buscema succeed is in the thrill of adventure and passion. However, what is lacking is true character evolution. In some sense, despite humanity’s hatred, it takes 18 issues for the Silver Surfer to finally change his stance towards humanity. At the same time, though a hero, he initially remains a lone hero, without a regular supporting cast.

ART

Perhaps, the art is the series’ strongest point. John Buscema’s pencils are drawn to perfection and he has produced the most imposing and welcoming Silver Surfer to date. Though a bit embellished, Buscema’s pencils draw distinctive characters. Indeed, the women tend to have curvy physiques, long hair and full lips while the men have strong arms, big hands and very proportionate physiques. Really, Buscema’s classical training appears.

VERDICT

Finally, the Marvel Essentials storyline is high spectacle. Really, Stan Lee and John Buscema make a powerful combination. As matter of fact, they work seamlessly with tight plots, unrelenting action and gorgeous panels to create a work of legend.

Definitely, this storyline is one of the greatest Marvel stories ever told. Indeed, it belongs in every Marvel-ite’s collection.


RESOURCES

VISIT SILVER SURFER READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Question of the Week: What’s a Good Silver Surfer Reading Order?

Comic Book Reading Orders: Silver Surfer.

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Database Comics

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REFERENCES

Silver Surfer Vol 1 (1968–1970) in Marvel Database.

ARE YOU A NEW OR RETURNING VISITOR? WRITE A REVIEW.

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Reviews: ’00s The Authority Storylines, Ranked From Best To Bad

 
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REVIEWS

‘The Authority: Revolution’ (2005) #7. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

2000s THE AUTHORITY STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO BAD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: “THE AUTHORITY: THE NATIVITY” (2004)

Collects ‘The Authority’ #13-16.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

When ‘The Authority’ (2000) #14 was released, it generated immediate controversy. As a critically-acclaimed writer, Mark Millar has been known to go against social conventions and mores. If anything, his run on ‘The Authority’ delivers the thrills, wanton violence and the social commentary. But, Frank Quitely’s art elevates the subject matter.

To begin, the Authority was set up after Stormwatch in order to make the world better, no matter what it takes. Story-wise, “The Nativity” centers on a conflict between the Authority and a government-sanctioned team of Super Powered Beings (SPBs) called the Americans. Namely, the conflict is over the newborn Jenny Quantum, whom they believe to be the Spirit of the 21st Century. Terribly, disaster and mayhem follow when a team of Ubermensch with its draconian measures faces against government conspiracy from the Americans.

In a sense, ‘The Nativity’ is both a pastiche and a commentary on America’s patriotism at the beginning of the century. As a pastiche, it is a meta message on the superhero team the Avengers and its alliance with a corrupt government. Certainly, the commentary is about America’s muscular and military patriotism. In fact, these are reflected in the muscular and chiseled physiques of Frank Quitely’s figures. And when the Commander beats down and rapes Apollo, all hell breaks loose!

Definitely, this story is quintessential The Authority and belongs in your Kindle collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “The Authority (1999-2002) (2 book series)” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE KINDLE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: ‘THE AUTHORITY: REVOLUTION’ (2004-2005)

Collects ‘The Authority: Revolution’ #1-12.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2004, Eisner-winning writer Ed Brubaker and artist Dustin Nguyen collaborated on ‘The Authority: Revolution’. Brilliantly, the work is a masterful distillation of the Authority, as the great super-powered team of the 21st century.

At the beginning, the Authority is fresh off the events of ‘Coup d’Etat.’ Forcefully, the Authority have taken over the U.S. government. However, their daily lives are mired in bureaucracy and a growing resistance to their regime. When a catastrophic event occurs in front of the White House in Washington D.C., the Authority uncover a conspiracy that threatens the team’s cohesion.

In some sense, the series can be divided into two parts. In the first half, the team investigates Henry Bendix’s conspiracy. For the second half, the story focuses on the emergence of the new Jenny Quantum, the Spirit of the 21st Century. For its part, Nguyen’s art captures the urgency of the moment. To this end, the characters are drawn with little expressiveness on a blue, black and red palette. In fact, Nguyen’s art features both gore and more revealing panels.

To sum, what makes ‘The Authority: Revolution’ work is the maturity of both its characters and the subject matter. In addition, it was significant for the remarkable emergence of Jenny Quantum and her fantastic travels to Infinite City. Moreover, Midnighter’s farewell speech stands out.

Definitely, this graphic novel is a classic The Authority story. Indeed, fans of Ed Brubaker will love the political intrigue as well as the advanced sci-fi concepts.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “The Authority by Ed Brubaker & Dustin Nguyen (The Authority: Revolution) BELOW TO BUY THE KINDLE & COMIXOLOGY COMIC ON AMAZON.

GOOD: ‘COUP D’ETAT‘(2004)

Collects ‘Coup D’Etat’ #1-4.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In “Coup d’Etat: Sleeper,” Matt Martin forcefully argues ‘Coup d’Etat’ is a poor commentary on American politics during the Bush administration. In fact, the argument focuses on not mingling comics and politics.

To this end, ‘Coup d’Etat,’ largely plays like political commentary. In some respects, the Authority’s takeover of the U.S. government parallels the Bush administration’s Iraq war and its subsequent overthrow of the Iraqi government. Here, the Authority figures as the U.S. government overthrow the Iraqi government.

What makes ‘Coup d’Etat’ work, are the routine deliberations between the different factions about the fate of the world. In parallel, Spartan and Grifter argue. Also, Spartan and the Authority debate. Originally, the Authority were founded after Stormwatch and WildC.A.T.s. To this end, their mission was to make the world a better place no matter the cost. When Apollo kills the President at the end, political power has been passed over.

A few words about the art. For his part, Jim Lee’s art is certainly acceptable but not in-character. In fact, it appears to suffer from the subject matter of the political thriller. Nevertheless, the work itself is non-stop action as the Authority goes on missions to take control of the U.S. government. In the final issue, the Authority must flex their muscles and stop an alien invasion.

Definitely, the series is certainly a must-have for your comic collection, with a blend of adventure, action, plenty of dark humor and sci-fi themes.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Coup D’etat by Ed Brubaker (2004-11-01)” BELOW TO BUY THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

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BAD: ‘THE AUTHORITY: PRIME’ (2007-2008)

Collects ‘The Authority: Prime’ #1-6.

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In many respects, ‘The Authority: Prime’ is a missed opportunity. Certainly, it provides an important backstory on Henry Bendix. Previously, he was the mastermind behind Stormwatch and the Authority. In effect, his importance to the Authority cannot be denied. In fact, writer Christos N. Gage fails to give the subject matter the serious treatment it demands. Instead, it proves the occasion for three-issue futile fisticuffs between the Authority and Stormwatch.

To sum, Weatherman, Henry Bendix’s son, cracks his father’s “memory tower.”1 When he locates Bendix’s bunker to the Southwest desert, the Authority and Stormwatch come to a clash to uncover it first. Though, the battles are spectacle. However, they are told in three issues and do not move the story forward.

On this list, this series is one of the bad ‘The Authority’ story arcs.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Authority: Prime (Authority (Graphic Novels))” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT THE WILDSTORM UNIVERSE READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Wildstorm Universe Reading Order!


SOURCES

The Authority: Revolution #1 in Comic Vine.
The Authority #14 in Comic Vine.
The Authority #13 in Comic Vine.
Coup d’État: Sleeper in Sequart Organization.
Coup D’etat in Comic Vine.
The Authority: Prime in Comic Vine.

FOOTNOTES

  1. The Authority: Prime #1.

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Reviews: 2000s Luke Cage Storylines Ranked Best To Good

 

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'The Pulse: Fear.'
‘The Pulse: Fear.’ AP Photo/Marvel Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

2000s LUKE CAGE STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO GOOD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: “THE PULSE: FEAR” (2005).

Collects ‘The Pulse’ #11-14.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Initially, Marvel introduced their superstar heroine Jessica Jones with the adult Mad Max series ‘Alias’. In a few words, Jessica is a retired superhero that developed a romantic relationship with Luke Cage. Moving forward, ‘The Pulse’ showcases Jessica Jones’ pregnancy with Cage as the father.

AT CBR.com, Brian Cronin lists “The Greatest Luke Cage Stories Ever Told!” On his list, Mr. Cronin recommends “The Pulse: Fear” as the top Luke Cage story. Chiefly, “The Pulse: Fear” shows why Brian Michael Bendis may be the most versatile writer at Marvel. Previously, Bendis worked on the Marvel Ultimate titles such as ‘Ultimate Spider-Man,’ ‘Ultimate X-Men,’ and ‘Ultimate Fantastic Four.’ Bendis’ work on “The Pulse: Fear” reveals the greater maturity of the subject matter. What makes the series work is that its two protagonists are real people with real problems. In addition, the Marvel superhero community is portrayed in a supportive light.

To sum, the art, the plot and the dialogue have a realistic and grounded feel. Together, these elements make for an enjoyable coming-of-age experience. In the end, the characters mature and their relationships become more authentic. Definitely, ‘The Pulse’ is essential Luke Cage and Jessica Jones, and belongs in your Luke Cage collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “The Pulse Vol. 3: Fear” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: “NEW AVENGERS: BREAKOUT” (2005).

Collects ‘Action Comics’ #775.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2005, Brian Michael Bendis and David Finch gave the Avengers a fresh new look. After “Avengers: Disassembled,” the Avengers disbanded. Then, Marvel gave us the New Avengers joined together by fate.

Like the former Avengers team, the New Avengers formed to take on a threat that no member could take on their own. Centrally, the plot is tight and focuses around capturing the villain responsible for the Raft prison breakout. The new Avengers team is not SHIELD-backed by Director Maria Hill.

Thematically, the New Avengers are a street-team. To this end, their members are: Captain America, Iron Man, Spider-Man, Spider-Woman, Luke Cage and Wolverine. Particularly, Luke Cage grounded the team and is a vocal member. What makes the team work, is the fact it is free of politics and mainly seeks to get the job done.

As Gabeel Gaber points out, the New Avengers outlaw status after the “Civil War” caused them to fight smaller scale foes. Originally, the Avengers would fight Ultron and Kang the Conqueror. Instead, the New Avengers would fight the Wrecking Crew and the Hand.

While this is not a Luke Cage story, it is important. Eventually, Luke Cage leads the 2010 version of the New Avengers after Cap is arrested and apparently killed during Civil War. Definitely, ‘New Avengers’ belongs in your Luke Cage collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “New Avengers, Vol. 1: Breakout BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: ’80s HE-MAN AND MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

GOOD: ‘SECRET WAR’ (2004).

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Surely, politics are important to a spy agency like SHIELD. In ‘Secret War,’ Brian Michael Bendis and Gabriele Dell’Otto extend more mature themes.

Really, Bendis’ writing adapts to the elevated subject matter. If in ‘New Avengers,’ Bendis’ characters’ chemistry is light-hearted, ‘Secret War’ gives them a more serious treatment. In addition, Dell’Otto’s panels are like Chiaroscuro comics: Dark, violent with 3D-like effects.

Story-wise, there is a subversiveness that persists over the lobotomy of Nick Fury’s Secret War team. To begin, Luke Cage is in Mount Sinai Medical Center after an attack in retaliation for the Secret War. In his anti-terrorism war, Nick Fury is willing to go to any lengths. Indeed,the US government would not take action on Latveria-funded terrorist activity in the United States. Simply, Colonel Fury creates a secret team comprising of Captain America, Spider-Man, Daredevil, Luke Cage, Nick Fury, Black Widow and Agent Daisy Johnson.

In the end, the heroes come out on top. Without a doubt, Luke plays a minimal role in the story. Nevertheless, this belongs in your Luke Cage collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Secret War (2004-2005) (5 book series)” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

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GOOD: ‘NEW AVENGERS ANNUAL‘ #1 (2006).

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In his “Greatest Luke Cage Stories Ever Told!,” Brian Cronin ranks ‘New Avengers Annual’ (2006) #1 number seven. Let’s give a brief review.

To begin, Bendis’ ‘New Avengers Annual’ #1 celebrates Luke Cage’s and Jessica Jones’ marriage. On the day Jessica accepts Luke Cage’s marriage proposal, they are attacked by a false version of Black Widow. If anything, the heroes’ banter are characteristic of Bendis. Moreover, their quips serve as battle intros.

Definitely, ‘New Avengers Annual’ #1 ranks as one of the greatest Luke Cage stories.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “New Avengers (2004-2010) Annual #1” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT LUKE CAGE READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Luke Cage Reading Order.

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Database Comics

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SOURCES

The Greatest Luke Cage Stories Ever Told! in CBR.com.
The Pulse Vol 1 (2004–2006) in Marvel Database.
New Avengers Vol 1 1 in Marvel Database.
New Avengers: How One Street-Level Team Changed the Marvel Universe Forever in CBR.com.
Chiaroscuro in Comic Book Glossary.
Secret War #1 in Comic Book Round Up.
New Avengers Annual Vol 1 1 in Marvel Database.

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Reviews: Best ’90s Supreme Storylines

 
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In 'The Legend Of Supreme' (1994) #3, Supreme leaves the Earth in anguish over his killing of Father Beam.
In ‘The Legend Of Supreme’ (1995) #3, Supreme leaves the Earth in anguish over his killing of Father Beam. Photo/Image Comics

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

’90s SUPREME STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO WORST

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: ‘THE LEGEND OF SUPREME’ (1994).

Collects ‘The Legend of Supreme’ #1-3.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Notably, Alan Moore’s Supreme has been celebrated as the definitive version of the character. In 1994, Keith Giffen previously worked on the series. In many respects, ‘The Legend of Supreme’ gave the anti-hero his most distinctive style.

Really, the world of superheroes has its saviors, anti-heroes and vigilantes. To begin, the story is set in 1939. Fortuitously, a reporter named Maxine Winslow investigates Supreme’s “origin story.” But, what she finds about the hero is shocking. In “The Gospel According To Ethan Crane,” the savior reveals in a manuscript his religious motivations behind his particular brand of justice.

Here, Supreme blends the vigilantism of the Golden Age with religious crusading. In the Modern Age, superheroes are rarely portrayed as saviors, with right reason. However, Liefield’s more self-righteous hero is properly a messiah. And when Father Beam disapproves of his methods, tragedy follows.

Definitely, this story is a good primer on Supreme. What makes it work, is the earnestness of the characters and their chemistry. Without a doubt, it is geared towards an adult audience.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “LEGEND OF SUPREME #’s 1-3 Complete story BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

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BEST: “SUPREME: THE STORY OF THE YEAR” (1996).

Collects ‘Supreme’ #41-52.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

To this day, Alan Moore is revered as a legendary writer in the comic genre. In fact, he won the 1997 Eisner Award for Best Writer. To this end, the comic legend has produced for DC Comics some of the most celebrated works in the genre. Namely, I speak of “Watchmen” and “V For Vendetta.” Furthermore, his work on Supreme led to a rebirth of the character in 1996.

Without a doubt, “The Story Of The Year,” is Moore’s most influential work on Supreme. Successfully, Moore converted Supreme from a violent ’90s Superman analogue to an optimistic Superman-like hero. As Reed-Hinckley Barnes from Multiversity notes, there is a meta message in Supreme’s story arc about superheroes and the stories about them.

SILVER AGE

To this end, Moore’s story arc incorporates Silver Age-style flashbacks into each issue’s narrative structure. In some sense, they are the result of editorial “revisions” that function as comics within the comic issue. In reality, following his quest for meaning, Supreme’s amnesia caused the character’s Limbo. Therefore, it was up to the character to regain his roots in order to truly become a Silver Age Superman. Certainly, the effect is to turn the whole work into a classic.

Indeed, Alan Moore completely revamped the hero. In fact, Supreme is every bit the Image Comics version of Superman: He was raised in Littlehaven where he began his superhero career as a Kid Supreme; as an adult, he moved to Omegapolis; Darius Dax, his nemesis is a Lex Luthor pastiche; Supreme even joined the Allies and the Infinity League in the 1940s. Overall, what makes the story arc work is its emphasis on family, tradition and child-like adventure.

Definitely, this story is essential Supreme and Alan Moore fans will love the Silver Age flashbacks.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Alan Moore’s: Supreme: The Story of the Year” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: ’80s HE-MAN AND MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

BEST: ‘SUPREME: THE RETURN’ (1999).

Collects ‘Supreme: The Return’ #1-6

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Notably, ‘Supreme: The Return,’ marks the grand return of Supreme’s arch-nemesis, Darius Dax. In “The Most Powerful Image Heroes From The ’90s,” Supreme is at the top. Unfortunately, due to a Moore company collapse, the last two issues in the arc were not completed. Nevertheless, this story arc is included on this list as important Supreme comics.

Moreover, Supreme’s level of power in the final issue is unrivaled. Indeed, in a meta-narrative, Supreme meets DC and Marvel pastiches before meeting the “Monarch.” In grand style, Supreme encounters the Writer, Jack Kirby, in idea space. Faced with Kirby’s world, the Writer states Supreme’s level of power allows him to achieve virtually anything. In fact, such is the nature of Supremium that it warps reality.

In the end, Supreme recounts his adventure to his new girlfriend, Diana Dane. Certainly, Supreme seems to have come of age, finally accepting his secret identity and his superhero life. Definitely, this is a must-have to your Supreme collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON ‘Supreme. The return’ BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT SUPREME READING ORDERS:

Alan Moore’s Forgotten Awesome: The Upcoming Forgotten Awesome Reading Order.

DO YOU READ COMICS? EVENT

Database Comics

RSVP: OCTOBER 2ND @ 9 AM


SOURCES

The Legend of Supreme #1 in Comic Vine.
SUPREME: The Story of the Year in Publishers Weekly.
Supreme: The Story of the Year in Multiversity Comics.
Alan Moore at Awesome, Day 1: Supreme in The Comics Cube.
Supreme: The Return in Comic Vine.
The Most Powerful Image Superheroes From The ’90s, Officially Ranked in CBR.com.
SUPREME: The Return in Publishers Weekly.

FOOTNOTES

  1. Superman #204.
Posted on 5 Comments

Reviews: 90s-00s JLA Storylines, Ranked From Best To Good

'Justice' (2005) #1 Cover.
 
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'Justice' (2005) #1 Cover.
‘Justice’ (2005) #1 Cover. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

90s-00s JLA STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO GOOD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: “JLA: TOWER OF BABEL” (2000).

Collects ‘JLA’ #43-46.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

“JLA: Tower Of Babel” is a classic JLA story. Really, it showcased at the time, why the Justice League was DC’s premiere superhero team. True, Superman may function as the first among equals. Though, Batman is revealed to be the most dangerous man on DC Earth.

Certainly, it is a case of Bat-god Syndrome. The main plot of the story is the following: Eco-terrorist Ra’s Al Ghul has hacked Batman’s contingency plans. In his paranoia, the Dark Knight had developed over the years contingency plans. In effect, they were intended to neutralize each member of the Justice League, should they ever go rogue. Of course, when the plans are enacted, disaster ensues.

Mark Waid and Howard Porter collaborate on this timeless story. Without a doubt, what makes it work is the larger-than-life feel of the pencils. Porter’s lines are crisp, athletic and the coloring brings movement to life. The consequences of the story arc lead directly into “JLA: Divided We Fall.”

Overall, this is the best Post-Crisis JLA story. Moreover, Batman fans will geek-out at Bat-god in the loose adaptation Justice League: Doom available on Blu-ray.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “JLA “TOWER OF BABEL” PAPERBACK TPB” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: “IDENTITY CRISIS” (2004).

Collects ‘Identity Crisis’ #1-7.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2004, Brad Meltzer and Rags Morales crafted “Identity Crisis.” To date, no JLA story has been more controversial. In his “Guide,” Sam Stone at CBR.com argues the crossover event drove deep wounds within the superhero community. Indeed, its ramifications bled into the darker universe of “The OMAC Project” and Geoff Johns’ “Infinite Crisis.”

Chiefly, “Identity Crisis” is near the top of this list because of its inter-connectedness and the insurmountable danger it poses. The JLA is expert at handling crises, alien invasions, wars and natural disasters. However, moral dilemmas are another matter entirely. Simply put, what happens when the greatest DC Universe heroes are put before a secret involving questionable moral choices and tragedy?

While Rags Morales’ art shows the urgency of the situation, Brad Meltzer goes through the thought processes of its heroes in the narration. Then, what we are facing is a murder mystery that promises to rip through the relationships in the DC Universe. So, who wiped Doctor Light’s mind? Also, who wiped Batman’s mind? Finally, who is at fault? If these questions spring more dramatic events in the future, the story arc ends with a twist.

To sum, this is ethics put to the test of DC’s elite metahumans and gods. Precisely, it is why it belongs at the top of the list as one of DC Comics’ most thought-provoking stories. Definitely, this story is an essential JLA story.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Identity Crisis (New Edition) BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: ‘JUSTICE’ (2005-2007).

Collects ‘Justice’ #1-12. *This limited series is not canon to DC Mainstream continuity.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

‘Justice’ offers a flashback on previous Pre-Crisis JLA stories. In his 2009 interview with Newsarama, writer Jim Krueger revealed his inspiration for the 12-issue limited series. Specifically, Krueger intended a Super Friends vs Legion of Doom Silver Age story. And it showed the Silver Age elements resonated with fans. Indeed, ‘Justice’ #1 sold out upon its release.

Simply, the plot is straightforward. Motivated by dreams where the Justice League fails, members of the Legion of Doom assemble. In a few words, their plan is to destroy the JLA in order to better the world. Of course, it turns out their partnership is the result of manipulation by genius evil masterminds.

So, what makes ‘Justice’ work out is its ambition. By pitting against one another good superhero vs evil supervillain teams, Krueger crafts a “superhuman war.”1 More importantly, Alex Ross’s art is the central draw for the price of admission. Without a doubt, his photographic paintings create an experience worthy of the most timeless DC stories.

Definitely, this limited series is certainly a must-have for your JLA collection. In particular, fans of the Silver Age will love the classic feel of good vs evil.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Justice” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: 00s SUPERMAN STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

BEST: “JLA: EARTH-2” (2000).

*This story is a one-shot.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Decisively, “Crisis On Infinite Earths” put an end to the DC multiverse. However, the concept would resurface in continuity with “Zero Hour” and “Hypertime.” Largely because of Grant Morrison, the DC multiverse would surely come back. In a one-shot, “JLA: Earth-2” recounts the first multiversal meeting in Post-Crisis continuity. Per chance, the Justice League of America meets its antimatter counterpart from Earth-2, the Crime Syndicate of America.

Desperately, Lex Luthor, the unexpected hero from Earth-2, has come to the DC Primary Earth. Dangerously, he enlists the JLA to aid in fighting off the Crime Syndicate on Earth-2. Unfortunately, things do not go as planned. Eventually, the counterpart teams return to their respective worlds.

Definitely, one of the more polished JLA stories. In a CBR Exclusive, there is speculation that Earth-2 may originate from the Dark multiverse. Also, do not miss the animated movie Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths (Two-Disc Special Edition).

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON Jla: Earth 2 BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: ‘JLA: YEAR ONE’ (1998).

Collects ‘JLA: Year One’ #1-12

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Over the years, DC Comics published the “Year One” line of titles. In Post-Crisis continuity, they serve as important origin stories to the greatest heroes in the DC Universe. Previously, in “’00s Batman Graphic Novels Ranked From Best To Worst,” we reviewed Batman graphic novels set in the “Batman: Year One” continuity.

To begin, ‘JLA: Year One’ is set ten years ago in the Post-Crisis continuity. In short, it is part origin story and part world-building. In a few words, the Justice League of America first forms in order to stop an Appelaxian alien invasion. Soon, the JLA are a sensation on Earth. Despite their obvious differences, the founding members who are Green Lantern, Flash, Black Canary, Aquaman and Martian Manhunter must learn to work together. However, trouble brews. As they uncover the clues of the secret organization known as Locus, the JLA soon learn there is a spy in their ranks.

Obviously, the JLA are DC’s A-list superhero team. Indeed, Morrison’s JLA immortalized the Big Seven: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, Flash, Aquaman and Martian Manhunter. Here, what makes “Year One” work is the introduction of B and C-list heroes. Definitely, there is chemistry and even romance. In the final issue, is the grand finale with big splash pages of ensemble battles. Though, Brian Augustyn’s art suffers throughout the book due to a lack of distinctiveness.

Nevertheless, Mark Waid’s maxi-series is a fan favorite. Indeed, its blend of adventure, optimism and romance make for a fun experience. Definitely, this is essential JLA.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “JLA: Year One Deluxe Edition” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

A FAN OF GRANT MORRISON? BUY “SUPERMAN, THE GREATEST STORY”

LIKED MY E-BOOK? WRITE A REVIEW ON AMAZON.

VISIT THE PRODUCT REVIEWS PAGE.

GOOD: “JLA: ROCK OF AGES” (1998).

Collects ‘JLA’ #10-15

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Gloriously, “JLA: Rock Of Ages” is one of the most celebrated Justice League stories. In fact, the Morrison/Porter three and half year run has been touted the definitive JLA. In Grant Morrison’s JLA run, “Rock Of Ages” is the third story arc.

Storytelling-wise, Morrison’s story arc fits within a wider narrative. In effect, Morrison devised an alternate DC mythology with big sci-fi concepts and scale. This thread, of an impending crisis that threatens the entire DC multiverse, runs through Morrison’s story arcs. Dangerously, we envision a glimpse of that threat when Luthor and the Injustice Gang use the Worlogog to create an alternate future. In that future, Darkseid has imposed the Anti-Life Equation on New Genesis and Earth.

Critically speaking, the story appears bombastic. Yet, as the future would demonstrate, Morrison was erecting a Superman-centric universe. In “DC One Million,” that future comes to pass. Definitely, “JLA: Rock Of Ages” revealed DC’s most ambitious story yet.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Rock of Ages (Justice League (DC Comics) (paperback)) by Grant Morrison (24-Sep-2008) Paperback” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT JLA READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Justice League Reading Order.


SOURCES

JLA: Tower of Babel in DC Database.
Justice League: How Batman Took Down DC’s Mightiest Heroes in CBR.com.
Best Justice League stories of all time in Gamesradar+.
Identity Crisis in DC Database.
Identity Crisis: A Complete Guide to DC’s Most Controversial Crossover in CBR.com.
Justice Vol 1 in DC Database.
On Justice: Alex Ross Talks Justice in Newsarama.com.
DC’s “Justice” #1 Sells Out at DC Comics in CBR.com.
JLA: Earth-2 in DC Database.
Could DC’s Crime Syndicate Actually Originate From The Dark Multiverse? in CBR.com.
The 10 Best DC Year One Stories, Ranked in CBR.com.
JLA: Year One Vol 1 in DC Database.
JLA: Rock of Ages in DC Database.
Is Grant Morrison’s JLA the Definitive Justice League Comic? in DC Universe Infinite.

FOOTNOTES

  1. On Justice: Alex Ross Talks Justice.”

FEEDBACK

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Reviews: 2000s Superman Storylines, Ranked From Best To Good

 
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Superman: For Tomorrow. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

2000s SUPERMAN STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO GOOD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: “WHAT’S SO FUNNY ABOUT TRUTH, JUSTICE AND THE AMERICAN WAY” (2001).

Collects ‘Action Comics’ #775.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2001, Joe Kelly, Doug Mahnke and Lee Bermejo collaborated on “What’s So Funny About Truth, Justice And The American Way”. The extra-sized issue of ‘Action Comics’ #775, has been collected in the “Greatest Superman Stories Ever Told Vol. 1” Trade Paperback. According to Brian Cronin at CBR.com, ‘Action Comics’ #775 contains a meta-message.

Normally, comics are commentaries, criticisms and causes against society, mores and even political climates. However, here, the story comments on the place of Superman in the modern age. The question aptly put is whether the world still needs the old-fashioned Superman.

The storyline is about the Elite, a new breed of violent metahumans. Its team members are leader Manchester Black, a psychokinetic; Hat, with a magic hat; Coldcast, endowed with power over subatomic particles; and Menagerie. After they stop a terrorist threat in Libya, they announce themselves as the new breed of superheroes the world needs. Moreover, the people actually celebrate this new brand of violence. Due to the great loss of life involved, Superman questions their methods.

As Mr. Cronin points out, the meta-message is the popularity of the Authority at the time. In fact, the series was out-selling the Superman titles. Certainly, there have been plenty of stories involving Superman’s idealism and modern penchant for nihilism. One story, which is a classic, is “Kingdom Come” published in the 1990s. Nevertheless, where this story stands out is the fact it showcases how far Superman is willing to go to protect the people. Embracing their brutal tactics, the Man of Steel shows the Elite that American idealism is the best protection against violence.

Definitely, this story is one of the greatest Superman stories ever told. Successfully, the comic has been adapted to animation as “Superman vs The Elite.” In fact, it is available on Amazon in DVD and Blu-Ray formats.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Action Comics (1938-2011) #775 BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: “SUPERMAN: FOR TOMORROW” (2004).

Collects ‘Superman’ #204-215.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

“Superman: For Tomorrow” is one of the less celebrated and more controversial Superman stories. But this is precisely why it is near the top of this list. Normally, Superman is a man of action. Here, Superman is both a man of brain and brawn.

The collaboration on the work is top-notch. If Brian Azzarello seems to lose the subject in the second half of the storyline, Jim Lee’s pencils and art only get stronger over the course of the issues. Perhaps, one of the most original stories that cause Superman to question his place in the world. The plot centers about disappearances on Earth called the Vanishings which Superman has traced to an obscure corner of the Middle East. Moreover, the threat is personal since Superman’s wife, Lois Lane, disappeared during the events. So, Superman goes to confess his sins to a Catholic priest named Father Leone. He tells the priest: “My sin, was to save the world.”1

Throughout his history, Superman has been a vigilante, superhero and cosmic being. But here, he is something else. Indeed, Superman appears as a messiah. What makes this story stand out is because it covers the breadth of the character from a journey in space, to his work with the Justice League, to what he means to Metropolis and to his sanctum at the Fortress of Solitude. Though the writing can be cryptic, this is certainly one of the most innovative Superman stories both with regards to art and to story-telling.

Definitely, this story is essential Superman and belongs in your Superman collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Superman: For Tomorrow (Superman (1987-2006))” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: ‘SUPERMAN: BIRTHRIGHT’ (2003).

Collects ‘Superman: Birthright’ #1-12.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2003, Mark Waid and Leinil Francis Yu created ‘Superman: Birthright.’ At the time, the 12-issue series was meant to be the de-facto origin story of Superman. In fact, it replaced the 1986 ‘Man of Steel.’ Julian Beauvais at CBR.com, states five reasons why ‘Superman: Birthright’ is the definitive modern take on Superman’s origin story.

Generally, ‘Superman: Birthright’ may be divided in two halves. The first half is Superman’s proper origin story and discovering his alien heritage. The second is Lex Luthor’s origin story in Smallville and his connection to Krypton. In truth, fans of Smallville, will definitely love the pairing of both characters and of how Luthor played a hand in one of Superman’s weaknesses.

Certainly, Birthright works well as a coming-of-age story. Indeed, Clark discovers his origins from an alien Kryptonian pad. In true fashion, he decides to don his Kryptonian family’s costume in order to help humanity. In some sense, it is a modern approach that focuses on Clark’s humanity despite his alien nature. Moreover, another element works well. The public initially does not trust Superman, and Lex Luthor is chiefly the reason why. However, the problem that subsists is that despite Superman’s obvious intelligence, he shows little interest in decoding his history. In the end, Luthor unwittingly connects him to his past.

This series is certainly a must-have for your Superman collection, with a blend of adventure, action, plenty of comedy and sci-fi themes.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON ‘Superman: Birthright’ BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: ’80s HE-MAN AND MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

BEST: ‘SUPERMAN/SHAZAM!: FIRST THUNDER’ (2005-2006).

Collects ‘Superman/Shazam!: First Thunder’ #1-4

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Over the years, Superman and Captain Marvel (who became Shazam in the New 52 and Rebirth) have shared amazing adventures. Similarly, Judd Winick’s 2005 four-issue mini-series is no exception.

In truth, “Superman/Shazam” is the tale of the explosive first meeting between Superman and Captain Marvel. Successfully, Judd Winick has crafted a strong story narrated by the wizard Shazam. At the same time, Joshua Middleton’s art shines by its vibrant coloring and its strong lines.

In a few words, let’s discuss the storytelling. The storytelling is fast-paced and action-packed. Centrally, the action and the plot focus mainly on Doctor Sivana’s latest plot to destroy Captain Marvel. In fact, Marvel and his world are the focus of the story. Also, Superman plays an important part to the story and his dynamic with Captain Marvel adds heart. The final pages bring a satisfying conclusion to the story arc.

Winick’s mini-series is certainly a fan-favorite and a reason why Superman and Captain Marvel as a dynamic duo has tremendous potential. Fans of Captain Marvel will love this series.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON ‘Superman/Shazam!: First Thunder‘ BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

GOOD: “SUPERMAN/BATMAN: SUPERGIRL” (2005).

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

Surely, “Superman/Batman: Supergirl,” is the high point of Jeph Loeb’s run. On the heels of the hardcover sell-out, DC rushed solicits of the trade paperback. At the time, the popularity of Supergirl was at an all-time high. Successfully, the comic has even been adapted to the very popular “Superman/Batman: Apocalypse.”

Supergirl’s return to the DC Universe created tremendous enthusiasm. In fact, the new origin story of Supergirl showed her common heritage with Kal-El. At the same time, it distinguished her from him. Perhaps, Supergirl’s brashness are the results of her age, Kryptonian upbringing and her unfamiliarity with Earth.

What makes this comic work is the inherent tension within DC’s Trinity. First, Superman recognizes Kara Zor-El as his cousin and trusts her. Second, Wonder Woman wants to train her as an Amazon in the use of her super powers. Third, Batman does not trust her and fears his enemies might exploit her. In fact, Batman is correct. A threat looms large that threatens the DC Universe.

Michael Turner is the penciler and Peter Steigerwald is the colorist. There is a sense of eroticism in the art. Indeed, the male superheroes are drawn as exaggeratedly muscle-bound. In contrast, the females are drawn with large breasts and petite physiques. Though the art is appealing, the story and the action carry it. Definitely, the trade paperback offers a great experience.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Superman/Batman, Vol. 2: Supergirl” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

A FAN OF GRANT MORRISON? BUY “SUPERMAN, THE GREATEST STORY”

LIKED MY E-BOOK? WRITE A REVIEW ON AMAZON.

VISIT THE PRODUCT REVIEWS PAGE.

GOOD: “OUR WORLDS AT WAR” (2001).

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

“Our Worlds At War” was a massive crossover event in the early 2000s. Though, it has not had any earth-shaking impact on DC continuity. Nevertheless, it did show Superman making compromises with then President Luthor in order to save the DC Universe. Certainly, the existential threat is Imperiex, the embodiment of entropy. As usual, the cosmic villain seeks to hollow the universe in order to create a perfect one.

The event crossed over all the major DC titles at the time: Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Young Justice, Green Lantern to name a few. The comic documents Superman’s progress in space along Doomsday, destroying the Imperiex probes. Finally, Superman has to unlock his cosmic power and with the help of DC’s cosmic powers, triumph.

The crossover is collected under “Superman: Our Worlds At War.”

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Superman: Our Worlds at War – The Complete Collection by Jeph Loeb (Jun 10 2006)” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT SUPERMAN READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Superman Reading Order.

Comic Book Reading Orders: Superman.

DO YOU READ COMICS? EVENT

Database Comics

RSVP: SEPTEMBER 4TH @ 9 AM


SOURCES

Review: Superman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told Vol. 1 trade paperback (DC Comics) in Collected Editions.
Meta-Messages – Joe Kelly Wonders What IS So Funny ‘Bout Truth, Justice and the American Way? in CBR.com.
Action Comics Vol 1 775 in DC Database.
Superman: For Tomorrow in DC Database.
Super-Stars (Part 1): Mark Waid’s “Birthright,” The Official Origin in CBR.com.
Superman: 5 Reasons Why Birthright Is His Definitive Origin (& 5 Why It’s Man Of Steel) in CBR.com.
Superman: Birthright in DC Database.
Smallville: 10 Changes To Superman’s Origin Story That Made Him A Better Character in CBR.com.
Superman/Shazam!: First Thunder Vol 1 in DC Database.
DC Comics Rush Solicits “Superman/Batman: Supergirl” TP in CBR.com.
Superman/Batman Apocalypse Blu-ray Review in IGN.
Our Worlds at War in DC Database.

FOOTNOTES

  1. Superman #204.

FEEDBACK

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Reviews: 2010s Miles Morales Storylines, Ranked From Best To Good

 
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“Spider-Verse”. AP Photo/Marvel Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

2010s MILES MORALES STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO GOOD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: ‘ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN COMICS’ (2011).

In ‘Ultimate Spider-Man’ #1-5.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

While Slott was doing his mainstream run on Spider-Man, star writer gave us a hit series in ‘Ultimate Spider-Man Comics.’ After killing the Ultimate Spider-Man/Peter Parker, Bendis gave us a new Ultimate Spider-Man: Miles Morales. It is safe to say, Miles is the new, vibrant Spider-Man for Generation Z.

From the beginning, the first five issues tell the origin story of Miles Morales to becoming Spider-Man. At first glance, an up-and-coming youth from a troubled family. In reality, Miles wants to do the right thing and make it up the ladder in life. Surprisingly, Miles wins the lottery into a New York charter school. However, when an accident occurs, Miles life is changed and he becomes the hero he was meant to be.

Without a doubt, the dialogue is appropriate for the audience and though Miles and Genke are teenagers, they are aware of the superhero lifestyle: the young, good guy gets powers, defeats bad guy, saves people and gets the girl. In fact, it sounds like a formulaic Hollywood story which gets amplified in the animated movie. What makes the story work is the diversity, strength and earnestness of the characters. In the end, Bendis’ work shines and he is able to play up the characters’ chemistry with precision.

Overall, this storyline is definitely recommended to read before or after playing Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales on PS4.

INTERESTED IN FASHION? CLICK ON THE ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN T-SHIRT BELOW TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON.

BEST: “SPIDER-VERSE” (2015).

Collects “Spider-Verse.”

Rating: 5 out of 5.

“Spider-Verse” (2015) has to be one of the most satisfying Dan Slott’s runs on ‘Amazing Spider-Man’. Juliana Failde at CBR.com recommended the storyline in 10 Spider-Man Story Arcs Every Fan Should Read. It is the inspiration for the Golden Globe animated movie “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse” with Miles Morales as the titular character.

In an interview with CBR.com, Dan Slott revealed his inspiration for the storyline. Creatively, Slottt was to tell his version of the plot from the video game “Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions.” As matter of fact, it involved an artifact called the Tablet of Order and Chaos which threatened the lives of Spider-Man, Spider-Man Noir, Ultimate Spider-Man and Spider-Man 2099.

“Spider-Verse” is more a Peter Parker story than a Miles Morales story. The crossover event is ambitious and features the Spider-Men from the Marvel multiverse across continuity. There are touching and bonding moments. Though Spider-Man and Miles Morales have few panels together, their moments are bonding times. Spider-Man emerges as a leader capable of leading a team on a multiversal scale and Miles is a functional member of the team.

Anyone looking for a Miles Morales’-centric storyline would be misguided from the video games and the animated movies. At the same time, this is a crossover event not to miss out.

INTERESTED IN FASHION? CLICK ON “Marvel Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse Red Icon T-Shirt” BELOW TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON.


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CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: ’00s BATMAN GRAPHIC NOVELS RANKED BEST TO WORST.

GOOD: ‘SPIDER-MEN’ (2012).

Collects ‘Spider-Men’ #1-5.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

‘Spider-Men’ was Brian Bendis’ five-issue mini-series on the first crossover between the mainstream Spider-Man/Peter Parker and the Ultimate Spider-Man/Miles Morales. In continuity, it follows the death of Ultimate Peter Parker and the appearance of Miles Morales. In the storyline, the mainstream Spider-Man meets the new Ultimate Spider-Man.

In fact, the plot is simple but fun: In battle with Mysterio, the mainstream Spider-Man has crossed over to the Ultimate universe through an interdimensional vortex. Though, there are initial parallels between the mainstrem Spider-Man/Peter Parker and the Ultimate Spider-Man/Miles Morales in the first two issues. Forward, the plot immediately goes to center on Peter Parker and his impact as the previous Ultimate Spider-Man. Moreover, the plot progresses quickly towards its resolution and there are heart-warming moments with the Peter Parker family.

Previously, Sara Pichelli collaborated her art with Bendis on ‘Unltimate Comics Spider-Man.’ The two collaborate again on this series. Similarly, Pichelli’s pencils and inking translate well on digital printing. In truth, they lend to the Ultimate line of Marvel comics which pushes the envelope, upgrades superheroes and supervillains and at the same time caters to a younger audience. In the end, Pichelli’s pencils and ink are rough, not very expressive and to the point.

Overall, “Spider-Men” stands out mostly because it is focused, a-propos and serves to grant legitimacy to the new Ultimate Spider-Man, none other than Miles Morales.

INTERESTED IN FASHION? CLICK ON THE AVENGERS HULK SPIDER-MAN T-SHIRTS BELOW TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON.

VISIT MILES MORALES READING ORDER:

Comic Book Herald: Miles Morales (Spider-Man) Reading Order


SOURCES

5 Miles Morales Comics to Read After Finishing the Game in Metaverse.
Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales in PlayStation.com.
Writer Dan Slott Reveals the Secret History of the Spider-Verse in CBR.com.
10 Spider-Man Story Arcs Every Fan Should Read in CBR.com.


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Reviews: ’80s He-Man And Masters Of The Universe Storylines Ranked From Best To Good

In 'DC Comics Presents' (1982) #47, He-Man battles Superman.
 
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In 'DC Comics Presents' (1982) #47, He-Man battles Superman.
In ‘DC Comics Presents’ (1982) #47, He-Man battles Superman. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

’80s HE-MAN STORYLINES RANKED BEST TO GOOD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: ‘DC COMICS PRESENTS’ (1982) #47.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

‘DC Comics Presents’ was a series that featured Superman teaming-up with a different hero each issue. And oh boy, did they hit the ball in the park with this one! This issue is a kind of “What If” first team-up between Superman and He-Man.

We get our answers to what would happen if He-Man ever fought Superman. In their first encounter in DC history, Superman is brought from Earth to Eternia through a dimensional portal created by cosmic storm clouds. Skeletor is at one of his attacks at Castle Greyskull as he possesses half of the Power Sword! He-Man gets summoned by the Goddess and Superman travels to the strange world of Eternia.

This is a classic ’80s story with colors and pencils by Curt Swan. A more vintage art that favors bigger upper bodies and smaller legs. If you are a fan of the artist, this is classic Curt Swan. The fun, the action and the adventure belong in your ’80s He-Man collection.

This story is very reverent of both characters showing what makes each character work in the ’80s: He-Man, Man-At-Arms, Teela and the colorful cast of characters; the Superman/Clark Kent alter ego reminiscent of Christopher Reeve’s comedic tones. Both characters are true to themselves and form a formidable duo. Definitely a favorite story.

INTERESTED IN THE COMIC? CLICK ON “DC Comics Presents (1978-1986) #47” TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON.

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BEST: ‘MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE’ (1982).

Collects ‘Masters Of The Universe’ #1-3.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Paul Kupperberg and George Tuska’s three-issue series ‘Masters of The Universe’ may exemplify He-Man in the ’80s. At its best, He-Man deals with science fiction and fantasy themes comparable to Star Wars and Conan in the decade.

The world of ‘Masters of The Universe’ blends magic and science and figures the fantasy characters heading on a quest in order to save the Goddess. As matter of fact, ‘Masters of The Universe’ stands out because of the straight-forward natures of the quest. In some sense, what makes the comic work for the time period is the cartoony nature of the characters, which seem very well like one-dimensional characters: He-Man, Teela, Stratos and Man-At-Arms fight for good; whereas, Skeletor fights for Evil. The characters do not change.

The foci of the story are action and adventure. The adventure spans Eternia and the universe, from land, to sea, to space, to parallel dimensions. He-Man and co. fight snakes, dragons, demons, Beastmen, extra-dimensional creatures and even Skeletor. The action and the adventure are a thrill and are the parts that work the best in the comic. This is what He-Man is best at.

This is certainly a worthy addition to your He-Man and Masters of The Universe ’80s collection, with a blend of adventure, action, magic, and suspense.

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CHECK OUT THE REVIEW: 00s THOR STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO WORST.

GOOD: ‘HE-MAN AND THE POWER SWORD’ (1982).

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

“He-Man and The Power Sword” (1982) is the first of four Masters of The Universe miniature storybooks that accompanied the Mattel toyline. The storybook is clearly promotional material and serves as an introduction to He-Man and MoTU.

The storybook reads like a fairy tale. The water color art and the hyper-muscular lines of the characters creates the idea of legend and immortality. He-Man appears as a barbaric warrior who does not fear overwhelming foes and keeps fighting no matter the odds. The pacing is quick and focuses on the action, not the characterization. The plot is simple and straight-forward reminiscent of classic legends.

The storybook is aimed at children’s stories and works as a first introduction to the character.

INTERESTED IN AN ACTION FIGURE? CLICK ON ‘He-man Masters of the Universe Teela Action Figure‘ BELOW TO PURCHASE ON AMAZON.

VISIT MOTU READING ORDER:

DC Reading Orders: The DC Masters Of The Universe Reading Order


SOURCES

DC Comics Presents Vol 1 in DC Database.
The Surprisingly Awesome Comics History Of ‘Masters Of The Universe’ in Comics Alliance.
He-Man And The Masters Of The Universe in Vaults of Grayskull.

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Reviews: 00s Batman Graphic Novels Ranked From Best To Worst

In 'Batman' (2002) #608, Batman faces the beastly villain Killer Croc.
 

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In 'Batman' (2002) #608, Batman faces the beastly villain Killer Croc.

In ‘Batman’ (2002) #608, Batman faces the beastly villain Killer Croc. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

00s BATMAN GRAPHIC NOVELS RANKED BEST TO WORST

*This list is not exhaustive. For more information, refer to the Batman Reading Order and Timeline from The Gotham Archives.

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.


BEST: “BATMAN: HUSH.” (2002).

Collects ‘Batman’ #608-619.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

“Batman: Hush” is a Jeph Loeb and Jim Lee storyline. The storyline is certainly one of the most celebrated Batman stories of the 2000s. What makes the story stand-out is the mystery surrounding Lamont’s Ransom and Bruce Wayne’s relationship with childhood friend Thomas Elliott.

“Batman: Hush” includes art by Jim Lee which has stood the test of time and a plot by writer Jeph Loeb. The first half of the storyline is action-packed and is concerned with recovering Lamont’s Ransom. The second half seems to be less unified story-wise and features a major Batman rogue every issue. The second half is concerned with finding out the mysterious mastermind behind the recent attacks on Batman and Gotham City. It is Batman’s attempt at tying up loose ends and uncovering the mysterious masked villain who has been observing him on the rooftops.

There are lots of dialogue, descriptions and splash action pages. There is seriousness typical of Batman’s stories though after Poison Ivy is captured, the story kicks into high gear as the different attacks on Batman and the Bat-Family involve the villains exploiting Batman’s weaknesses. The storyline is masterful though the intrigue can at times be obvious. Batman and the Bat-family shine. One disappointment is the fact that the Batman-Catwoman relationship is not resolved at the end, but ends abruptly.

This storyline is probably the best Batman story of the 2000s because of the superstar talent involved and the amount of characters appearing in the plot. However, the resolution of the plot may seem anti-climactic and the Hush villain is not given enough emotional resonance in the final battle with Batman. Also, Batman’s rogues only serve to plant clues to the mystery but do not serve any characterizations.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “BATMAN: HUSH” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: “BATMAN: THE MAN WHO LAUGHS.” (2005).

Collects ‘Batman: The Man Who Laughs’ #1 One-shot.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

“Batman: The Man Who Laughs” (2005) is Ed Brubaker’s and Doug Mahnke’s one-shot set within the “Batman: Year One” continuity. It sets up a turning-point in Batman’s crime-fighting career as he encounters the chaotic menace of Joker for the first time.

“Batman: The Man Who Laughs” is one of the very few origin stories on Joker. What makes Ed Brubaker’s story stand out is the focus on Joker’s crime spree in Gotham City instead of focusing primarily on his origin story. Joker works best here as the one that moves the story forward and whose genius mind always seems two steps ahead of Batman’s. Indeed, the definition of a criminal mastermind.

Batman definitely grows from his experience with the Clown Prince of Crime. A serious and disciplined mind, Batman’s training excels with the murderers, rapists and muggers. However, he is ill-prepared for psychotic killers of Joker’s ilk. What is Joker’s motive and what is his modus operandi? To see Gotham City burn and to have every Gothamite die laughing!

This is certainly a worthy addition to your Batman collection, with a blend of suspense, action, intrigue and gore. The comic is not for the faint of heart and is destined for a more mature audience.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “BATMAN: THE MAN WHO LAUGHS” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: BATMAN AND THE MONSTER MEN (2006).

Collects ‘Batman and The Monster Men’ #1-6.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

“Batman and the Monster Men” (2006) is Matt Wagner’s six-issue mini-series as part of his Dark Moon Rising series. Another mini-series created by Wagner is “Batman and The Mad Monk.” The purpose of the series was to tell the story of Batman transitioning from fighting organized crime to fighting supervillains.

In an interview with CBR.com, Wagner revealed his inspirations were two Golden Age stories about the Caped Crusader. Wagner sees the Batman stories as re-inventing classic tales from Batman’s rich history. And it fits. For fans of the Golden Age Batman stories and “Batman Year One”, the mini-series has kept many of the classic elements: Batman’s cape and cowl remain the same following the “Year One” storyline – though he upgrades the Batmobile -, the lettering and inking are maintained throughout the different series, and the emphasis on storytelling as opposed to social commentary and action is maintained. The transition from vigilante to superhero is not immediately evident, but the beginning is there.

Some words about the storyline. In the “Year One” continuity, “Batman and the Monster Men” takes place after Year One but before the Man Who Laughs. Batman definitely seems to be learning on the job and the inclusion of Hugo Strange seems a marked difference from the usual Arkham Asylum rogues. In fact, Batman faces superpowered foes in the vein of mutated cannibalistic monsters twice. The story is tight and progresses at a satisfying pace. The art fits the storyline and the darkness that envelopes the panels forebodes the monstrosities of Hugo Strange’s experiments. There is horror and blood, characteristic of Batman’s crime cases. What Wagner shows is that Batmn is first and foremost a detective, whose dedication to solving crime cases jeopardizes hi personal and his love life.

Wagner succeeds in crafting a tale with classic elements that is sure to satisfy Batman fans. Definitely pick this comic if you want to see the evolution of Batman after “Batman: Year One”.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “BATMAN AND THE MONSTER MEN” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

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Comicbook Database is a great site if you are a comic book fan! The Battles of the Week a great way to learn about the different power levels of the heroes, and a fun way to fancast some of the most wanted battles across comics.

Brian Tudor, ‘The Infamous Podcast’


CHECK OUT THE STORY: IN “HUSH,” BATMAN HAS TO FREE SUPERMAN FROM POISON IVY’S MIND CONTROL AND RECOVER LAMONT’S RANSOM.

GOOD: “BRUCE WAYNE: FUGITIVE” (2002).

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.

“Bruce Wayne: Fugitive” (2002) is a storyline by Ed Brubaker, Chuck Dixon, Greg Rucka, Devin Grayson, Kelly Puckett, Rick Burchett, Rick Leonardi, Steve Lieber, Trevor McCarthy, Scott McDaniel, Roger Robinson, Damion Scott and Pete Woods.

The storyline centered on Batman facing a personal threat and losing touch with his humanity. After Bruce Wayne and his bodyguard Sasha Bordeaux were framed for the murder of Vesper Fairchild at Wayne Manor, Bruce Wayne evades captivity, cuts ties with the Bat-Family and investigates the case as Batman full-time. Concurrently, the Bat-Family carries its own investigation.

This storyline works as an exploration of Batman as a character. What makes this comic good is the fact Batman is presented with a challenge he has hardly faced and with the question of whether Bruce Wayne is the facade and Batman the real persona. Batman does regain touch with his humanity and manages to solve the case, however, at great personal cost to his love life.

What deprives the story of its impact is the lack of consistency in pacing and art since there are different writers and artists involved. The work suffers from uneven pacing and problems with visual story-telling in some issues.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “BRUCE WAYNE: FUGITIVE” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

GOOD: “BATMAN: RULES OF ENGAGEMENT” (2007).

Collects ‘Batman Confidential’ #1-6.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

“Batman: Rules Of Engagement” (2007) is a six-issue mini-series by Andy Diggle and Whilce Pottacio. The mini-series is set a year into Batman’s crime-fighting career and reveals a war of weaponry between Lexcorp and WayneTech.

The series may not have received good reviews. One review commented on the art, the plot, and on Bat-god. One element of the story that is missing, is the lack of good and a repetitive visual storytelling in the final battle. Pottacio’s lines are dark, daring and violent. Though he does not excel at conveying emotions and telling a story, he is good at ensembles and splash pages.

The series explains the transition to Batman using more hi-tech weaponry, his rivalry with Lexcorp and the formation of the Wayne Foundation. If you want to see a well-executed weaponry battle between Batman and Lex Luthor, this comic should entertain you. It may provide clues to who is the better strategist and prep-planner between two of the smartest men in the DC Universe.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “BATMAN: RULES OF ENGAGEMENT” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES


SOURCES

Batman Vol 1 608 in DC Database
Batman Timeline – Modern Age Chronology and Reading Order in The Gotham Archives.
Batman: Hush in DC Database.
Batman: Hush – 5 Ways The Comic Aged Well (& 5 Ways It Hasn’t) in CBR.com.
Batman: The Man Who Laughs in DC Database.
Batman: Year One in Batman Wiki.
Batman: The Man Who Laughs Review in IGN.
Batman and the Monster Men Vol 1 in DC Database.
Batman and the Mad Monk Vol 1 in DC Database.
Pulp Fiction: Wagner talks “Batman and the Monster Men” in CBR.com.
Batman: Who Was the Real Killer In Bruce Wayne: Murderer? in CBR.com.
Batman: Rules of Engagement in DC Database.
BATMAN: RULES OF ENGAGEMENT in The Slings & Arrows GRAPHIC NOVEL GUIDE.


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