Reviews: ’00s The Authority Storylines, Ranked From Best To Bad

Home » Reviews » Reviews: ’00s The Authority Storylines, Ranked From Best To Bad

SUPPORT MY PATREON


SUBSCRIBE TO RECEIVE NEWS, UPDATES ABOUT THE BATTLE RANKER AND UPCOMING WIKIS

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

REVIEWS

‘The Authority: Revolution’ (2005) #7. AP Photo/DC Comics.

IN Reading Guides, Lists, Reviews

2000s THE AUTHORITY STORYLINES RANKED FROM BEST TO BAD

STAR RATINGS:

Best: 5 to 4.5 stars.

Good: 4 to 3 stars.

Bad: 2.5 to 2 stars.

Worst: 1.5 to 0 stars.

BEST: “THE AUTHORITY: THE NATIVITY” (2004)

Collects ‘The Authority’ #13-16.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

When ‘The Authority’ (2000) #14 was released, it generated immediate controversy. As a critically-acclaimed writer, Mark Millar has been known to go against social conventions and mores. If anything, his run on ‘The Authority’ delivers the thrills, wanton violence and the social commentary. But, Frank Quitely’s art elevates the subject matter.

To begin, the Authority was set up after Stormwatch in order to make the world better, no matter what it takes. Story-wise, “The Nativity” centers on a conflict between the Authority and a government-sanctioned team of Super Powered Beings (SPBs) called the Americans. Namely, the conflict is over the newborn Jenny Quantum, whom they believe to be the Spirit of the 21st Century. Terribly, disaster and mayhem follow when a team of Ubermensch with its draconian measures faces against government conspiracy from the Americans.

In a sense, ‘The Nativity’ is both a pastiche and a commentary on America’s patriotism at the beginning of the century. As a pastiche, it is a meta message on the superhero team the Avengers and its alliance with a corrupt government. Certainly, the commentary is about America’s muscular and military patriotism. In fact, these are reflected in the muscular and chiseled physiques of Frank Quitely’s figures. And when the Commander beats down and rapes Apollo, all hell breaks loose!

Definitely, this story is quintessential The Authority and belongs in your Kindle collection.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “The Authority (1999-2002) (2 book series)” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE KINDLE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BEST: ‘THE AUTHORITY: REVOLUTION’ (2004-2005)

Collects ‘The Authority: Revolution’ #1-12.

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 5.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.5 out of 5.0 stars.

In 2004, Eisner-winning writer Ed Brubaker and artist Dustin Nguyen collaborated on ‘The Authority: Revolution’. Brilliantly, the work is a masterful distillation of the Authority, as the great super-powered team of the 21st century.

At the beginning, the Authority is fresh off the events of ‘Coup d’Etat.’ Forcefully, the Authority have taken over the U.S. government. However, their daily lives are mired in bureaucracy and a growing resistance to their regime. When a catastrophic event occurs in front of the White House in Washington D.C., the Authority uncover a conspiracy that threatens the team’s cohesion.

In some sense, the series can be divided into two parts. In the first half, the team investigates Henry Bendix’s conspiracy. For the second half, the story focuses on the emergence of the new Jenny Quantum, the Spirit of the 21st Century. For its part, Nguyen’s art captures the urgency of the moment. To this end, the characters are drawn with little expressiveness on a blue, black and red palette. In fact, Nguyen’s art features both gore and more revealing panels.

To sum, what makes ‘The Authority: Revolution’ work is the maturity of both its characters and the subject matter. In addition, it was significant for the remarkable emergence of Jenny Quantum and her fantastic travels to Infinite City. Moreover, Midnighter’s farewell speech stands out.

Definitely, this graphic novel is a classic The Authority story. Indeed, fans of Ed Brubaker will love the political intrigue as well as the advanced sci-fi concepts.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “The Authority by Ed Brubaker & Dustin Nguyen (The Authority: Revolution) BELOW TO BUY THE KINDLE & COMIXOLOGY COMIC ON AMAZON.

GOOD: ‘COUP D’ETAT‘(2004)

Collects ‘Coup D’Etat’ #1-4.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Dialogue: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 4.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In “Coup d’Etat: Sleeper,” Matt Martin forcefully argues ‘Coup d’Etat’ is a poor commentary on American politics during the Bush administration. In fact, the argument focuses on not mingling comics and politics.

To this end, ‘Coup d’Etat,’ largely plays like political commentary. In some respects, the Authority’s takeover of the U.S. government parallels the Bush administration’s Iraq war and its subsequent overthrow of the Iraqi government. Here, the Authority figures as the U.S. government overthrow the Iraqi government.

What makes ‘Coup d’Etat’ work, are the routine deliberations between the different factions about the fate of the world. In parallel, Spartan and Grifter argue. Also, Spartan and the Authority debate. Originally, the Authority were founded after Stormwatch and WildC.A.T.s. To this end, their mission was to make the world a better place no matter the cost. When Apollo kills the President at the end, political power has been passed over.

A few words about the art. For his part, Jim Lee’s art is certainly acceptable but not in-character. In fact, it appears to suffer from the subject matter of the political thriller. Nevertheless, the work itself is non-stop action as the Authority goes on missions to take control of the U.S. government. In the final issue, the Authority must flex their muscles and stop an alien invasion.

Definitely, the series is certainly a must-have for your comic collection, with a blend of adventure, action, plenty of dark humor and sci-fi themes.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Coup D’etat by Ed Brubaker (2004-11-01)” BELOW TO BUY THE COMIC ON AMAZON.

BUY “SUPERMAN, THE GREATEST STORY”

LIKED MY E-BOOK? WRITE A REVIEW ON AMAZON.

VISIT THE PRODUCT REVIEWS PAGE.

BAD: ‘THE AUTHORITY: PRIME’ (2007-2008)

Collects ‘The Authority: Prime’ #1-6.

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

Dialogue: 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Plot: 2.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Characterization: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

Art: 3.0 out of 5.0 stars.

In many respects, ‘The Authority: Prime’ is a missed opportunity. Certainly, it provides an important backstory on Henry Bendix. Previously, he was the mastermind behind Stormwatch and the Authority. In effect, his importance to the Authority cannot be denied. In fact, writer Christos N. Gage fails to give the subject matter the serious treatment it demands. Instead, it proves the occasion for three-issue futile fisticuffs between the Authority and Stormwatch.

To sum, Weatherman, Henry Bendix’s son, cracks his father’s “memory tower.”1 When he locates Bendix’s bunker to the Southwest desert, the Authority and Stormwatch come to a clash to uncover it first. Though, the battles are spectacle. However, they are told in three issues and do not move the story forward.

On this list, this series is one of the bad ‘The Authority’ story arcs.

INTERESTED IN THIS STORY? CLICK ON “Authority: Prime (Authority (Graphic Novels))” BELOW TO PURCHASE THE COMIC ON AMAZON.


RESOURCES

VISIT THE WILDSTORM UNIVERSE READING ORDERS:

Comic Book Herald: Wildstorm Universe Reading Order!


SOURCES

The Authority: Revolution #1 in Comic Vine.
The Authority #14 in Comic Vine.
The Authority #13 in Comic Vine.
Coup d’État: Sleeper in Sequart Organization.
Coup D’etat in Comic Vine.
The Authority: Prime in Comic Vine.

FOOTNOTES

  1. The Authority: Prime #1.

FEEDBACK

Leave a Reply